I am at war

I wake up exhausted, if I close my eyes and try to go back to sleep my mind will go into overdrive.  I am better off opening my curtains and waiting for sunrise as I turn on the television.  The news anchors are talking about the 2021 Australian budget.

Amongst the announcements, there will be no major Covid19 outbreaks and International borders will stay closed until the middle of 2022. I find this announcement remarkable, I read an article yesterday about western countries such as the USA and England racing back to travel and that zero-covid economies like Australia could face hermit risk.   

I look out the window to my neighbor.

 A big shiny high rise building, it’s empty, another scary sign of the world we are now living in because of Covid-19.  My friends in Melbourne are mostly working from home now.

I stare at the evidence glaring at me 24 hours a day 7 days a week for 14 full days.  I cannot leave my small room, the policeman in the hallway is the warden.

I am more than halfway through my mandatory quarantine, I have settled into a routine of being incarcerated.

A big shiny high rise building, it’s empty, another scary sign of the world we are now living in because of Covid-19. 

The first few days of my imprisonment were a different story, I am grateful that I have gotten through the first week.

This week I am not running to the peephole every time I hear activity in the hallway.  

Through the peephole I can see staff dressed in full Covid-19 combat gear, sometimes spraying my front door, vacuuming, dropping of meals or taking a Covid19 swab test from the tenants at the doorway from the room opposite. 

The nurses test me every two days, every test has come back negative, which is what I expect. 

I have already had the first jab of Astra Zeneca vaccine almost 5 weeks ago. 

 The tests will continue at my door every two days until I am released.  The nurse also checks in every day, by making a telephone call to my room.

They call me to ask me if I have any Covid19 symptoms, if I am eating and drinking, and what I have planned for the day.  I find this last question hilarious.

This week I am not running to the peephole every time I hear activity in the hallway.  

I often think about the people in this building.  I am in a hotel that is run in conjunction with a hospital.  We all have different reasons for being here, we all have some sort of pre-existing medical issue.

I am still coming to terms with the diagnosis after my radical mastectomy in Bali.  The beast had spread to my lymph nodes and I need treatment to fight back.

Leaving my husband and baby was heart wrenching but necessary. 

The medical care I will receive in Melbourne is the best in the world. 

With the help of a small group of determined, intelligent and connected women I made it back home to Australia safely. The gratitude I feel is hard to put into words, my prayer and meditation routine is my main source of strength.

Appointments have been made.

 I am all set to begin my battle the same day I leave quarantine.

I ask my readers to please pray for my victory and the strength of my loved ones at this time. 

I need to focus on myself.

I need to slay the beast and win the war.

Blessings always

Sharon xxx

Melbourne lockdown

Born in the heart of a City

That City is a lady

Some say she is a miniature London

Most are in awe, the acres of manicured gardens in that busy City

So pretty

Trams

Theatre

Concerts

MelbourneMelbourne lockdown, Image James Rowland 10 Aug 2020

Aussie rules footy

Tennis

Arts….Comedy

I miss you Melbourne

I am feeling your pain

You will get through this

My heart is yours



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Tri Sandhya Villa

Melbourne lockdown – a reflection of Covid-19 ©August 2020

 

 

Racist confrontation at the historic Big Building in Chapel Street, Prahran

Melbourne was voted the most liveable City in the world seven times, however recently Vienna has pipped our lady to the post.

The two metropolises have been neck and neck in the annual survey of 140 urban centres for years, with Melbourne clinching the title for the past seven editions.

Melbourne’s cultural diversity attracts millions of overseas and domestic travellers annually. Visitors converge on our garden state to indulge in shopping, theatre productions and architectural sightseeing just to name a few.

Historical early twentieth century buildings such as the magnificent Big Store located at 303 Chapel Street, Prahran radiates nostalgic days of emporia style shopping.

Prahan.jpg

Big Store located at 303 Chapel Street, Prahran radiates nostalgic days of emporia style shopping.

Prahran is known for its stylish bars, Southeast Asian eateries and late-night clubs.

Greville Street is a synonymous Melbournian haunt with its hip cafes, specialty boutiques and groovy Greville Records.

People watching is a fun pastime as you sip your long black coffee gazing out of the window of your favourite café, a tram meanders past on a perfect day in urban paradise. The eclectic mix of residents makes for an interesting vibe.

Luxury cars driven by executive’s pull onto the curb in a hurry, well dressed business people dash to that important meeting.

Locals from the social housing in high rise towers wander purposefully. Prahan is inclusive and a true representation of multicultural Melbourne.

There is always one person though, one citizen that throws the balance into disarray, that citizen who is pissed, stoned or both.

One perfect day in Melbourne a middle aged white drunk man staggered into that historical Big Store in Chapel Street, Prahran which is now occupied by Coles Supermarket.

The express check out was in process, shoppers quickly grabbing a few supplies before heading home on a that perfect Melbourne day.

The production line stopped abruptly.

The middle aged drunk man became abusive.

The inebriated man started yelling at the taller man of colour. I couldn’t believe my ears as he swore and told him to go home. Screaming at the top of his lungs saying that he didn’t belong in Melbourne.

The middle aged man was standing so close to the taller man I was afraid he would throw a punch, he continued to shout profanities.

The taller man did not react, he patiently listened to the offensive bigot as he told him to go back to where he came from and that he didn’t belong in his Country.

I was searching for the security, I was mesmerised by the crowd who stood motionless as they witnessed the abusive confrontation. The thought crossed by mind to intervene, to do so though may have resulted in a being punched.

I asked one of the staff to urgently call for security, I was fearful that the drunk man would throw a punch at the taller man.

The swearing intensified, the crowd stood frozen.

Eventually the Manager of the store arrived, more insults were shouted at the taller man before he was ushered onto Chapel Street.

The offender stumbled onto the pavement as he mumbled profanities about the tall man being a black prick and to fuck off back to his own Country.

The cue at the express check out started to move again, the incident was over, however I felt obliged to express my regret.

It was only when I apologised to the tall man that I discovered he was the security guard at Coles.

The security guard told me that the drunk man had been forbidden to enter Coles, as he had a history of being abusive.

This tragic display of hatred and racism was exposed in public at the historical Big Store, both residents and tourists witnessed a violent display of xenophobia on a perfect day in Melbourne.

I walked away feeling nostalgic, remorse and sadness.

Blessings always

Sharon x

Sharon Karyasa ©2019

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