I am at war

I wake up exhausted, if I close my eyes and try to go back to sleep my mind will go into overdrive.  I am better off opening my curtains and waiting for sunrise as I turn on the television.  The news anchors are talking about the 2021 Australian budget.

Amongst the announcements, there will be no major Covid19 outbreaks and International borders will stay closed until the middle of 2022. I find this announcement remarkable, I read an article yesterday about western countries such as the USA and England racing back to travel and that zero-covid economies like Australia could face hermit risk.   

I look out the window to my neighbor.

 A big shiny high rise building, it’s empty, another scary sign of the world we are now living in because of Covid-19.  My friends in Melbourne are mostly working from home now.

I stare at the evidence glaring at me 24 hours a day 7 days a week for 14 full days.  I cannot leave my small room, the policeman in the hallway is the warden.

I am more than halfway through my mandatory quarantine, I have settled into a routine of being incarcerated.

A big shiny high rise building, it’s empty, another scary sign of the world we are now living in because of Covid-19. 

The first few days of my imprisonment were a different story, I am grateful that I have gotten through the first week.

This week I am not running to the peephole every time I hear activity in the hallway.  

Through the peephole I can see staff dressed in full Covid-19 combat gear, sometimes spraying my front door, vacuuming, dropping of meals or taking a Covid19 swab test from the tenants at the doorway from the room opposite. 

The nurses test me every two days, every test has come back negative, which is what I expect. 

I have already had the first jab of Astra Zeneca vaccine almost 5 weeks ago. 

 The tests will continue at my door every two days until I am released.  The nurse also checks in every day, by making a telephone call to my room.

They call me to ask me if I have any Covid19 symptoms, if I am eating and drinking, and what I have planned for the day.  I find this last question hilarious.

This week I am not running to the peephole every time I hear activity in the hallway.  

I often think about the people in this building.  I am in a hotel that is run in conjunction with a hospital.  We all have different reasons for being here, we all have some sort of pre-existing medical issue.

I am still coming to terms with the diagnosis after my radical mastectomy in Bali.  The beast had spread to my lymph nodes and I need treatment to fight back.

Leaving my husband and baby was heart wrenching but necessary. 

The medical care I will receive in Melbourne is the best in the world. 

With the help of a small group of determined, intelligent and connected women I made it back home to Australia safely. The gratitude I feel is hard to put into words, my prayer and meditation routine is my main source of strength.

Appointments have been made.

 I am all set to begin my battle the same day I leave quarantine.

I ask my readers to please pray for my victory and the strength of my loved ones at this time. 

I need to focus on myself.

I need to slay the beast and win the war.

Blessings always

Sharon xxx